Your Quick Guide for Buying The Best All-Around Electric Guitar

RockJam RJEG02 6 String Electric Guitar
Buying your first electric guitar can feel overwhelming. With thousands of options, countless brands, and a wide price range, it can be hard to pick one. If you are new to guitars altogether, you need to first consider whether an electric guitar is a right choice. There’s no denying that electric guitars are impressive and can be a good alternative to classical guitars for learning. Also, these electric variants are available in more sizes, so beginners, kids, and those with smaller hands can also find something worth their needs. If you are into pop music, this is exactly what you need. In this guide, we are sharing more on finding the best all-around electric guitar, with five products that we love. 
 
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RockJam RJEG02 6 String Electric Guitar
 

RockJam 10 Watt Electric Guitar Superkit

  •  Features:  
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  • – Brand: RockJam
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  • – Color: Sunburst
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  • – Hand Orientation: Right
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Pyle Electric Guitar and Amp Kit
Pyle Electric Guitar and Amp Kit
  • Features:  
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  • – Brand: Pyle
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  • – String Material Type: Steel
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  • – Color: Black
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Leo Jaymz DIY Hollow Body Electric Guitar
Leo Jaymz DIY Hollow Body Electric Guitar
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  • – Brand: LEO JAYMZ
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  • – Number of Strings: 6
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  • – Fretboard Material : Rosewood
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CNBLUE 39 Inch Electric Guitar

CNBLUE 39-inch Electric Guitar

  • Features:
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  • – Brand: CNBLUE
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  • – Hand Orientation: Right
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  • – Fretboard Material: Technology wood
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EART E-C3D Electric Guitar 6 String Right Solid
EART E-C3D Electric Guitar
  • Features:  
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  • – Brand: EART
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  • – Color: Blue
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  • – Hand Orientation: Right
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5 Best All-Around Electric Guitar

If you are new to music and don’t wish to spend a fortune, consider this RockJam electric guitar that features a basswood body. It comes with three single-coil pickups, besides a dedicated volume control and pickup selector. The kit also includes a 10-watt guitar amp, which makes it a great starter kit. You also get additional guitar strings and guitar picks, along with a bag and strap.   

What We Liked
What We Didn’t Like

This Pyle Electric Guitar comes with dual humbucker pickups, producing a deep and smooth sound for better learning. There is also a headphone output, so you can practice at your own ease. Other features include a practice amplifier, Paulownia wood construction, rotary control, and a 3-way pickup selector. If you are somewhere between beginners and intermediate level of learning, this could be a good pick.    

What We Liked
What We Didn’t Like

As the name suggests, this is a hollow body electric guitar, which comes in basswood construction with a veneer top. With a maple neck, the guitar has 22 frets and 2 Humbucker pickups. It features a Tune-o-Matic bridge, and the scale length is 24.72-inch. All the accessories that you would want are included, such as picks, gig bag, and strings. Note that this is a DIY guitar, which means you have to ensemble the guitar with the components given in the box.   

What We Liked
What We Didn’t Like

This Electric Guitar from CNBLUE features a poplar body with a maple neck and craft wood fingerboard. It comes with advanced three-way switches and 1v2T pickups, with 22 copper-nickel frets, which makes it ideal for budget buyers and beginners. A Gig Bag is included in the package. The sound of this guitar is pretty much basic but allows feedback to improve learning.  

What We Liked
What We Didn’t Like

The EART E-C3D Electric Guitar is a perfect choice for immediate players and learners. It features a mahogany body coupled with a carbonized maple neck and Rosewood fingerboard. This is a 24-fret guitar that comes with nickel silver frets and an S-S-H pickup. It includes a 5-way switch.     

What We Liked
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 How to buy an all-around electric guitar?

Size

Are you trying to find an electric guitar for your child? Do you need one for yourself? The size is an important factor to consider. You can find guitars that have smaller necks and bodies, which are ideal for beginners and those with smaller hands. On the other hand, some people are just more comfortable with a full-sized guitar. 

Types

 There are three categories of electric guitars to choose from – Solid Body, Hollow Body, and Semi-Hollow Body. A solid-body electric guitar is designed to offer the perfect guitar experience, although you may not get as much resonance. On the other hand, Hollow-body guitars feel more like acoustic guitars and are a great choice for those interested in jazz or deep bass. A semi-hollow body guitar is better for resonance when compared to solid-body ones.   

Electronics

Expectedly, electronics play a dominant role in the sound and acoustics of an electric guitar. The most common is a single-coil pickup, which produces bright sounds, but can be prone to producing hum. Humbucker pickups may deal with that concern and are often preferred over single-coil guitars. If you are into rock or heavy metal music, a humbucker may work better. The third option is called piezo pickups, which can be used to replicate the sound of an acoustic guitar.    

Keep in mind that your budget and eventual use of the guitar should eventually determine the right choice. Don’t hesitate to check reviews before you select one of our products listed above. 

Frequently Asked Questions

Does the choice of wood matter?

Yes, the wood used for an electric guitar will make a difference in the sound. Mahogany is known for its resonance, while maple is often the standard choice for guitar necks. There is also rosewood, which is used for fretboards. Expensive guitars often have Ebony fretboards. For solid body guitars, ash is a better choice than mahogany. Agathis and Alder are other woods used for electric guitars. If you don’t want to get confused, go for either mahogany, maple, or poplar.    

How important is the scale length?

The scale length of an electric guitar, for the uninitiated, refers to the distance between nut and saddle. It is important because it determines the space between frets, which can make a difference in learning. Typically, most electric guitars either have a Gibson scale, which is measured at 24.75-inch, or a Fender scale at 25.5-inch.   

Does the brand matter for choosing an electric guitar?

Yes, it does. Compared to some of the standard classic guitars, electric guitars can be expensive, especially when made by top brands. Note that the wood and construction are not merely the factors for pricing here. In the case of electric guitar, pickups, electronics, and other components can add to the cost.   

Conclusion

A good electric guitar is the one that you are comfortable using. It may take a while to understand and play the instrument, but YouTube is your biggest free resource to learn music. If you don’t want to get confused, go for a basic electric guitar from any of the known brands, and once you know the experience, you can always switch to something better. Do consider if the product comes with add-ons and accessories.   

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